Saturday, 31 March 2012

Green Sandpiper





This Green Sandpiper was present the other day on a stretch of water that is known locally as the Maxey cut, a small river close to the reserve of Maxey gravel pits.

The river is extremely low at the moment and the Environment Agency have been removing the larger fish from the river in order to put them in the River Welland which still has fairly healthy water levels. With the drought that most of England is experiencing at the moment I can only see this situation getting worse.

Back to the bird. The Green Sandpiper does not breed in Britain, but is found in the country during migration, with a small population of between 500-1,000 overwintering here. Unusually, for a wader it nests in trees, typically in old Woodpigeon and Thrush nests.

A fairly regular sight in the PBC area, with Maxey being a traditional site for them.

12 comments:

  1. Pretty bird and wonderful photos.

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    1. Thanks Eileen,
      Yes, a bird with an understated beauty.
      J

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  2. Nice looking bird and your caught some pretty good reflexions too.

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    1. Thanks Gillian, the bird does `blend` into the background a bit though.
      J

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  3. Hi John. Given your description this must be a rare sighting.
    I had a great day today at Valentine's Park Round Lake. I saw, as well as all the usual residents, an Egyptian Goose and one chick (a passer-by told me that she had seven but the others were killed), three Mandarin males and one female, a Greylag Goose and I think a pair of Sheldrake Ducks.
    Click here for Bazza’s Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

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    1. Hi Bazza,
      Not really a rare sighting, but a scarce one in Britain. They are a fairly regular bird on my patch.
      Sounds like you had a good day at your lake, shame about the Egyptian Goose chicks and do you mean a pair of Shelduck? A lovely bird.
      J

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  4. Great bird and a great picture - esp with the reflections .

    Cheers - Stewart M - Australia

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  5. Gorgeous reflections, John! Your shots are beautiful!

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    1. Hi Gary,
      Thank you, too kind.
      J

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  6. You took some great shots John. Its never easy to get this species.
    I did see some L/Egrets up there the other day, but no sign of this one.

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    1. Hi Roy,
      Thank you. It was the closest that I have ever managed to get to this breed, they are pretty jumpy. I only noticed him when I accidentally flushed him whilst walking along the bank, with their geen colouration they are easy to miss.
      J

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