Sunday, 14 October 2012

Pectoral Sandpiper






This image is digiscoped
This juvenile Pectoral Sandpiper has been present at a site called Kelling Water Meadows for about 10 days now, sticking loyally to the one pool present. On my arrival at the site, however, the bird was not present. Typical, I thought, but I was informed by a couple of local birders that in the mornings the bird is sometimes elsewhere and will fly in at some point. Half an hour went by and then, on cue the Pectoral Sandpiper flew in and proceeded to feed and show very well.

The photos show very nicely the white 'braces' on the back of the bird and the neat 'scaly' pattern of the upper feathers, which identify it as a juvenile. The adult bird is less 'scaly' and the 'braces' are either more faint or absent altogether. This bird has not been hatched and raised in this country, it will have been blown off course whilst on migration in America. The Pectoral Sandpiper is the most common of all American vagrants to Britain and Ireland and September to October is the prime time of the year for them to visit.

18 comments:

  1. Hi John...He sure is a nice looking fella...love the pattern of his feathers, which you caught really nicely !!Lucky for you that he was blown of course!! I easily do that every day : }}!
    Grace

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    1. Thanks Grace,
      It was a fine looking bird! Very lucky that it was blown off course, hopefully it will get back on the right course at some point.
      J

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  2. Pretty shots of the Sandpiper!

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    1. Thanks Eileen, very kind of you.
      J

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  3. Lovely images of a beautiful sandpiper John.

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  4. Excellent shots John.
    One I've never seen before.

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    1. Thanks Keith,
      I am lucky in having seen a few, still waiting for one locally though!
      J

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  5. Brilliant John, you have found the Pectoral Sandpiper, I am jealous.

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    1. Thanks Bob, don't be too jealous! ;)
      J

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  6. Great shots John. A couple told me they had seen this bird (we were in Norfolk last week). I presume these are digiscoped, they told me the views were good but slightly distant?
    Regards Mike

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    1. Thanks Mike,
      Only one of the images is digiscoped, the last one, the others are with the SX40 at full zoom. It wasn't too distant at first, but then it flew further away.
      J

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  7. These are lovely images John.
    I have never 'Knowingly ' seen one.
    What an amazing bird.

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    1. Thanks Roy, a very lovely and amazing bird.
      J

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  8. It's a long way of course isn't it? Where would it most likely be migrating to?
    Click here for Bazza’s Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

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    1. Hi Bazza,
      It is indeed, they tend to over-winter in South America, this one got blown in our direction, maybe it will get blown back?
      J

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  9. Very pretty bird and great pictures.

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    1. Thanks Gillian, it was a lovely, smart looking bird.
      J

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